30 Years Wasted. How To Do Ramana Maharshi’s “Who Am I?” All Wrong.

When the Me-Story's Gone.

When the Me-Story’s Gone.

NEAR FLAGSTAFF, AZ

April 22, 2016 9:34 AM

Yesterday, for the book, I wrote:

I spent about 30 years of my life doing Ramana Maharshi’s “Who am I?” technique all wrong. The query is so simple that it’s hard to believe anyone could do it wrong, but spiritual techniques and theories are so notoriously vague and incomplete that assumptions—usually incorrect assumptions—are by necessity made by students.

Sad but true.

Here is what I was doing wrong by asking myself, “Who am I?” for thirty years…

  • I was rationally examining the Me-thing

Am I the past that I remember? No. I experience my past (two things, the memory and I-the experiencer). Who am I?

Am I this body? No. I experience this body (two things, the body and I-the experiencer). Who am I?

30 years of that crap. Wrong, wrong, all wrong. I’d be pissed if I still took my past seriously.

Flipping the diagram from The ‘Me’ Vacuum post, all I was doing was activating the World-Part of my brain by rationally making the Me-story into an external object (a thought in the World-Part of my brain).

A Thought in the World-Part of the Brain

A Thought in the World-Part of the Brain

What I should have done:

  • Activate the Me-Part of my brain by getting in touch with the feel of the Me-thing. The FEEL of Me.
  • THEN pull away everything that wasn’t “me” (my past, my story, my body, …).

What this would have done is activated the Me-Part of the brain then emptied its contents which, as I wrote earlier does this:

Bang! The Gateless Gate vanishes, all self-boundaries drop, and enlightenment—the Emptiness/Vastness/one with everything—is experienced.

The Gateless Gate: Both Sides Active.

The Gateless Gate: Both Sides Active.

It's Time To Wake Up

Mystical Oneness and the Nine Aspects of BeingMystical Oneness and the Nine Aspects of Being is a step-by-step guide to enlightenment and beyond.

It contains everything you need in order to wake up to enlightenment, inner peace, and unconditional love.

This book was seven years in the making. It contains pretty much everything I know about enlightenment and the mystical realms beyond.

Wayne

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6 thoughts on “30 Years Wasted. How To Do Ramana Maharshi’s “Who Am I?” All Wrong.

  1. Maybe a better term for the “World-Part” of the brain would be the “Not-Me Part”—the part that says, “What I am observing is not me, but something other than me.” The Who Am I practice makes the thought of the I an object in the Not-Me part (thoughts of Me are not the same thing as the Me).

    This is a work in progress. It’s a blog, not a book. It’s evolving.

  2. Hi, Wayne!

    Thank you so much for sharing all this; I don’t know of anyone else doing this sort of thing, online or otherwise. Question in regard to the section above where you say: “What I should have done:”
    In regard to the actual sitting and saying ‘Who Am I?’……are you saying that you’re answering this question by getting in touch with the feeling of you? And then by acknowledging the difference between that and all your conceptions of ‘you’ (past, body, etc.)?
    Is there any sort of repetitive/systematic method involved, or did you find it better to just take your time answering the question, just sitting and exploring that answer during the entire sitting session?
    Apologies if I’m missing an obvious point here; just mainly trying to wrap my ‘mind’ around the actual approach/experience of sitting and going through the process.

    Warm regards,

    John

    • “…getting in touch with the feeling of you? And then by acknowledging the difference between that and all your conceptions of ‘you’ (past, body, etc.)?”

      No. I’ll post a more detailed technique soon, but no, it’s not about comparison, the proper way is about activating the Me-Part of the brain, then thinking of anything you take personally and dropping it as not-me. What is left is an empty Me-Part (which is the goal of the exercise).

  3. Hi Wayne. I agree: getting into the feeling of it is so important. Otherwise, the question prompts the mind for a conceptual answer, which would just replace one thought with another one. My teacher also suggested changing “who” to “what”, i.e. “What am I?”, since what we’re really looking for is more like context than content. I think where I’m at now with inquiry, though, is more like “What is this?” …and (hopefully) feeling into whatever ‘this’ is.

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