Thank-You

The Fading Light

The Fading Light

THIRTY-NINE MILE MOUNTAIN, CO

August 9, 2015 8:47 AM

I looked up from Ken Wilber’s A Brief History of Everything to see the valley awash in the soft, golden light of the setting sun. Grabbing my camera, I hustled down the dirt road to get a clear and unobstructed shot.

Moments later, the sun dropped behind the low hanging clouds and the scene faded to dull, flat shades of grey. … Read more…

See What He Sees

Portrait of a Pine Cone

Portrait of a Pine Cone

FLAGSTAFF, AZ—When I got serious about taking photos, I did what a lot of serious photography students do: I found a photographer whose work I loved and blatantly tried to copy his style.

My hero was Harry Callahan (no, not that Harry Callahan).

But here’s the thing about photography—about any art form for that matter (I include spirituality here): Once you get the theory down—once you’ve learned the techniques—you need to learn how to see.

For a photographer, you need to learn how to see color and shape and texture and negative space. For a musician, you need to learn how to see tone and rhythm and pauses and flow. For the spiritual, you need to learn how to see Love and Light and Emptiness and the Divine.

When I started trying to copy Callahan, I wasn’t trying to copy his technique—I was already well versed in photography theory at that point—no, what I was trying to do was to learn to see how Callahan sees. I wanted to see what Callahan saw before he took those photos.

There’s a saying in Zen that goes something like this, “Don’t try to be like the sages of old, try to see what they saw.”

Once you get your spiritual technique down, try to see through all the mental boundaries. Try to see the music behind it all—the tempo and rhythm and pauses. Try to see the Archetype of Everything.

Once you get the theory down, pull away all self-contraction and open your eyes to the Love and the Light and the Emptiness and the Divine.

And in no time at all, you’ll become one with your art.

Focusing On a Subject

Holding It Together

Holding It Together

FLAGSTAFF, AZ—In photography, before you even raise the camera to your eye, it’s important to recognize what will be the subject of the photo. What will you focus on—and just as importantly—what will you leave out of the shot.

In creating a new project, it is important to know what functionality to include and what to do without. What is the subject that you should focus on to bring your project to life?

In spirituality, there are a million people trying to sell you (get you to focus on) a million products and services (subjects), so it is crucial to weed these distractions out if you ever wish to achieve inner harmony.

The only subject that you need to focus on in order to find inner peace is this: Your identity.

Who or what exactly are you?

Note: If you have an answer to this question then I’m afraid you need to keep looking.

A Stormy Afternoon

Untitled 1

Untitled 1

TILLAMOOK, OR—Finally. I thought it was never going to rain. You know it’s going to be a picture perfect day when everyone else is bitching about the weather.

As with most my recent photos, you can click on an image to see the full size version.

Untitled 2

Untitled 2

Untitled 3

Untitled 3

Untitled 4

Untitled 4

Untitled 5

Untitled 5

Using My Photos

Jigsaw Puzzle

Jigsaw Puzzle

BAKERSFIELD, CA—A couple people have asked me recently if it is OK to use my photos for their personal use.

Let me put this very clearly: It is OK.

I love it when people like my work enough that they want to use them for their computer desktop, or a screen saver, or, even for their jigsaw puzzle app.

I only ask that if you use them online (non-commercial) that you just provide a link to this site.

Want to use one for your book cover, or CD, or in an Ad? Just contact me first for permission. More often than not (especially if you’re self-publishing), I’ll let you use it gratis.

If you’re interested in any of the legal crap, see the Creative Commons license at the bottom of any of my web pages.

So download away. They’re on the house.

The Desolation Of Death Valley

Death Valley I

Death Valley I

LONE PINE, CA—As much as I love lonely photos—and with the unusually overcast day there was plenty of atmosphere for my style of photography—Death Valley left me feeling eerily uncomfortable. Not much shakes me, but something about this desolate place had me feeling oddly disturbed. As I left that haunted land, I felt my body unconsciously relax, as if some large, unseen hand had been gripping my flesh and—having escaped his dominion—was forced to release me.

Death Valley II

Death Valley II

Death Valley III

Death Valley III

 

Scenes From Cedar Key

Cedar Key I

Cedar Key I

WITHLACOOCHEE STATE FOREST, FLCedar Key reminded me of growing up in the Florida Keys: the bright pastel colors of the buildings, the charter fishing boats, the wooden seafood restaurants and the tiki bars and tee-shirted locals lazing away the day. The drop outs and bar flies and bicycles and bare feet and that ever present but oh so subtle attitude of having secretly seceded from the Union without America ever having realized it.

I liked it. It’s a tiny place, and a long drive through the middle of nowhere, but I’m glad I finally got to see it.

Note: All these square B/W photos you see me occasionally post are taken with the Hipstamatic iPhone app with a single film/lens configuration—I never ever change the film or lens settings and if I did, I’d never be able to figure out how to get them back so don’t ask me which configuration I use ’cause I don’t know and I don’t want to mess with it to try to figure it out and risk losing what I got—so forget it, don’t even ask.

But if you’re curious as to why I love this ultra-simple photo technique, then see this post.

Cedar Key II

Cedar Key II

Cedar Key III

Cedar Key III

Cedar Key IV

Cedar Key IV

Favorite Fotos Finally

The Pier

The Pier

LONG BEACH, MS—I finally got around to posting my favorite photos from 2010 to the present. You can find them on the menu at the top labeled, of all things, “Favorite Photos.”

The new galleys use a different plug-in (program) than the older 2008-2009 galleys, so they will work slightly different—and I didn’t start titling the photos, nor including the larger versions until 2013… so there’s that.

Feel free to use any image you like for your own use, but, as per the Creative Commons License (see the bottom of any web page), please don’t sell them or use them for commercial purposes without coming to some agreement with me first.

Enjoy (and no, they’re not for sale yet).

Natchez In Monochrome

Natchez I

Natchez I

SLIDELL, LA—Last Sunday morning, I arose early, grabbed the camera and strolled up, then back, the deserted Main Street of Natchez. Though it’s irrelevant to these photos, I always like to shoot city-scapes early in the morning (and preferably on a holiday) in order to get the “lonely photo” look that I love so well. It’s irrelevant to most of these shots just because most people can’t fly as high as I was shooting.

Click on any image to enlarge.

Natchez II

Natchez II

Natchez III

Natchez III

Natchez IV

Natchez IV